nLab domain specific programming language

Contents

Contents

Idea

A programming language is called domain specific if it is designed for a specific kind (domain) of applications, in contrast to general purpose programming languages.

If a domain specific language is realized inside a general-purpose language, one speaks of domain specific embedded programming language.

Examples

References

General

Examples

For differential equations:

  • Martin S. Alnaes, Anders Logg, Kristian B. Oelgaard, Marie E. Rognes, Garth N. Wells, Unified Form Language: A domain-specific language for weak formulations of partial differential equations (arXiv:1211.4047)

References

  • Paul Hudak, Domain Specific Languages, Chapter 3 (pp. 39–60) in: Peter H. Salas (ed), Handbook of Programming Languages, Vol. III: Little Languages and Tools, MacMillan (1998) [pdf, pdf]

  • Paul Hudak, Modular Domain Specific Languages and Tools, in: Proceedings of Fifth International Conference on Software Reuse, IEEE Computer Society Press (1998) [pdf, doi:10.5555/551789.853532]

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